Determinedly social

It’s no secret that health care providers need a far better understanding of social factors – like cultural differences, poverty and stigma – just to do their jobs. But to date, these essential factors have been an afterthought in their professional education.

That’s why we worked with the USC Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work to develop and launch the first graduate program in nursing oriented toward these factors and the kind of inter-professional collaboration necessary to effectively address them.

The program was shaped by findings in Health Plus Social, a publication we developed to explore the interplay of social determinants and professional education. Dean Marilyn Flynn wrote this in the foreword: “Conditions of poverty, injustice, and broken human relationships provide the etiology for gunshot wounds, delayed development, late-stage diagnosis, and lack of access to care. … Our experts here note that nursing may have more potential than other health professions in bringing power and authority to the idea of social determinants and incorporating this content into training and professional perspectives.”

As Innovator in Residence, we were part of the new graduate nursing program from its inception through the admission of the first cohort of students in August 2016. Our work continues in exploring how these social factors can inform a new research agenda for nursing science and new forms of doctoral education.